I Did Something I Never Thought I Would


I fished a commercial carp fishery!

I had been invited by Andy to take part in one of his firm’s occasional matches, and was interested to give it a go. There was a minor problem when first invited, as I was hoping that I would be at Wembley to see the Mighty Irons in the FA Cup semi-final on the day of the fishing match, but that wasn’t to be, so thanks to Andy for wangling an extra place for me at short notice.

Alders Farm once held the world match weight record at over 500lbs (not sure if this is still a record), but it had a reputation for the terrible condition of its fish. It’s since been under new management, and many of the fish have been removed, leaving a more sensible –but still very large – head of carp.

Due to the strict rules on the fishery (similar to rules at most fisheries of the type), I had to quickly get together a selection of tackle that I wouldn’t normally use, barbless hooks especially. It was also the first opportunity to try out my new seat box, a Maver Abyss X. It’s a small box by comparison to many others of its type, but it just about holds enough gear for my purposes, and allows for various accessories to be attached to the legs – useful when fishing on the platforms that are commonly found on match lakes. As well as for potential use on commercials, I intend to use it on the platforms on the stretch of the Thames that I fish.

Baits are also restricted on the fishery, notably you can only use their own pellets. Having forgotten to buy a tin of corn, luckily Andy was able to supply me with some, and that turned out to be fortunate, as events would reveal.

We arrived at the fishery and met up with the rest of the guys taking part, about ten of them in all. After dipping the nets, I popped into the fishery’s own tackle shop to stock up with pellets and also bought a couple of loaded pellet wagglers. Then it was down to the site’s café for breakfast. I didn’t bother with a fry-up as I’d eaten before leaving home, but enjoyed a mug of tea whilst the rest of the group tucked in.

Then the draw took place, and I drew peg 11 out of the hat. Not that that meant anything to me, as I knew nothing of the lake we were fishing (Pines Lake – one of 3 main lakes on the fishery), but I was informed that it was a good peg, as it had an island to fish to. On arriving at the lake, we were disappointed to note that some major tree and bush clearance had taken place, removing much of the marginal cover.

I set my gear up, a float rod to fish the pellet waggler, and a method feeder rod. At the all-in, I started off on the float, feeding pellets regularly. But no bites were forthcoming. To my right, the angler there (Gary?) lost four carp in the first hour or so, fishing the margins with a pole, but all the other anglers I could see – both the ones fishing our match, and the match on the opposite bank – were struggling for bites.

This could of course have been down to our own short-comings, but, like most anglers, we preferred to blame circumstances beyond our control, laying the responsibility on both the weather (it had been quite cold overnight) and the decimation of the vegetation.

I persisted with the float for about two and a half hours, which in hindsight was far too long, before switching to the method feeder rod. Baiting up with a crab & krill 10mm boilie, I cast right up to the island. There were some indications in the form of line bites that there were fish out there, but they didn’t seem interested in my hook-bait, so after about an hour of this and several more casts, I changed bait to a piece of corn. The impact was almost immediate, as within thirty seconds the rod tip hooped round and I was into a fish. Unfortunately, I wasn’t into it for very long as the hook pulled out.

My disappointment at losing the fish was only short-lived, however, as the very next cast resulted in a carp of around 4lbs residing in my landing net. I then proceeded to embarrass myself by missing the keepnet and dropping the fish straight back in the lake! So the match was about 4 hours old, and all I had to show at this stage was one lost fish and another that I couldn’t weigh in.

Whether the start of activity was triggered by the change of bait, or the fact that the weather had warmed a bit, I don’t know, but it was probably a combination of the two.

I persevered with the corn and method feeder for the rest of the match, and succeeded in repeating the above, with one lost fish and another landed, although this time I made sure it went into the keepnet. And that was it for the match. I knew that my one fish wasn’t in the running for the prizes, so I didn’t bother weighing in.

Andy wanted to stay on for a while after the match, so I carried on for a while on the feeder, while Andy tried the swim to my right, where there was a pipe inflow that attracts the fish. I had one more bite on the feeder, resulting in another hook-pull. Andy kept getting bites but missing them!

Meanwhile, I’d been feeding pellets in the margin of my swim, which eventually saw the arrival of at least two carp that began stirring up the mud. I switched to the float rod and fished a pellet where the fish were. Shortly, the float sank away and I was into what I thought was a decent carp, as it led me a merry dance around the lake. Once I got it into the net, it wasn’t as big as I thought it would be, and the reason it had given me the run-around was because it was hooked in the pectoral.

Although there was another carp rooting around in the margins, I couldn’t get it to take the bait, and that was the end of the action for the day. Despite the lack of fish relative to expectations, and that I could have had more in the net but for hook-pulls, I enjoyed the day.  The group of anglers we fished with were a good bunch, and I had some good banter with the guys fishing either side of me. Despite the rather cool temperatures for the time of year, I came home with a sunburnt face!

If I’m invited along to another of their matches, I will know a bit more about what to expect and will – hopefully – be better prepared next time.

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